2nd Deliberation Workshop: Accelerating Social Impact Solutions Through Collective Action Between Industry & Start-Ups

CEGET organised its 2nd Deliberation Workshop: Accelerating Social Impact Solutions Through Collective Action Between Industry & Start-Ups at Bombay Chambers of Commerce and Industry (BCCI), Mumbai on May 29, 2019. The event was curated in partnership with Chalk Talk.

With participation by over 40 business leaders, some of the key CEOs, CXOs, were present in the workshop, including the CEO of Thane Smart City, Mr Sameer Unhale. Deliberations were focused around SDG 6 (Water); SDG 12 (Consumption); SDG 11 (Cities) SDG 13 (Climate Action); SDG 17 (Partnerships).


Thane Smart City To Be The 1st SDG City Of India

THANE SMART CITY TO BE THE 1ST SDG CITY OF INDIA

Global Compact Network India (GCNI) signsanMoU with Thane Smart City Limited (TSCL)

GCNI CEGET signed a Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) Advisory MoU (Memorandum of Understanding) with Thane Smart City Limited on 31st May, 2019. Under the MoU CEGET will provide Thane Smart City Limited (TSCL) its assessment on SDG parameters and SDG advisory.

CEGET shall provide advisory services with respect to any of the chosen individual SDG/ SDGs that shall be prioritized after due process in the evaluation phase by TSCL. CEGET shall evaluate the city’s progress in meeting the SDGs at the city level through an internal assessment that would highlight strengths and areas of improvements for Thane. These would then become future reference points for the city in refining its approach to smart and sustainable development. The final output of the SDG Assessment shall be development of a Sustainability Framework for the city, based on the customized Key Performance Indicators and an amalgamation of international and local know-how and best practices. It shall serve as a policy tool to support TSCL in collecting and integrating data, and using those data sets to define a vision, set targets, monitor progress, and forecast trends—all while being able to compare themselves with peer cities.

Dr. Ashutosh Karnatak, Chairman, CEGET Committee, asserted that “A sound strategy for any organization should not be limited to commercial growth only and must include sustainable practices. He emphasized that sustainability of an organisation depends on PHP (performance, health and perception) and the unimpaired balance of these three elements is what keeps the organization growing. He asserted that our 65% population of India lives in villages so along with smart cities we should have more work on Sustainable Villages too”.

Mr. Sameer Unhale, Chief Executive Officer, Thane Smart City Limited, noted that “Thane Smart City Ltd is consistently aspiring to be sustainably smart. With the SDG Sustainability Framework coming out of our association with GCNI, we could inspire and impact 35 thousand odd cities and towns of the world. It is an exceptional opportunity for both parties to do something for posterity”.

Relaying the quintessential idea behind the MoU, Ms. Shabnam Siddiqui, Director CEGET said “SDG Assessment is meant to be a planning and advocacy tool that will prove to be a great asset in policy decisions and interventions for the city. Through this partnership SDGs will transcend from their current monitoring and reporting format to setting the ambitious roadmap that they were meant to do. While we at CEGET have been in discussion with multiple cities about the SDG Assessment idea for the last six months, Thane committed to being the SDG Champion by commissioning a voluntary SDG Assessment and setting a new benchmark for both cities and corporates. This will definitely be a game changer”.



2nd Deliberation Workshop: Accelerating Social Impact Solutions Through Collective Action Between Industry & Start-Ups

2nd Deliberation Workshop: Accelerating Social Impact Solutions Through Collective Action Between Industry & Start-Ups

CEGET organised its 2nd Deliberation Workshop: Accelerating Social Impact Solutions Through Collective Action Between Industry & Start-Ups at Bombay Chambers of Commerce and Industry (BCCI), Mumbai on May 29, 2019. The event was curated in partnership with Chalk Talk.

With participation by over 40 business leaders, some of the key CEOs, CXOs, were present in the workshop, including the CEO of Thane Smart City, Mr Sameer Unhale. Deliberations were focused around SDG 6 (Water); SDG 12 (Consumption); SDG 11 (Cities) SDG 13 (Climate Action); SDG 17 (Partnerships).

A number of great ideas and innovations were shared by both speakers and audience. The challenge that came out of the deliberation was of replicability and scaling of innovations – two factors CEGET intends to explore in subsequent deliberations.






Annual report on the progress towards the SDGs – UN

The report identifies cross-cutting areas where political leadership and urgent, scalable multi-stakeholder action are critical to shift the world onto a trajectory compatible with achieving the SDGs by 2030.

 

May 2019:

 

The United Nations 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) 2030, have made major shifts in the various fields of development. The corporates and non-government organisations have bind themselves to be part of the 17 SDG and work towards achieving success.

Recently, The UN Secretary-General has released the advance, unedited version of his annual report on progress towards the SDGs. The report identifies cross-cutting areas where political leadership and urgent, scalable multi-stakeholder action are critical to shift the world onto a trajectory compatible with achieving the SDGs by 2030.

The publication titled, ‘Special Edition: Progress towards the SDGs: Report of the Secretary-General,’ comes as the first four-year cycle of SDG implementation and review comes to a close, with the last sub-set of the 17 SDGs to be considered “in depth” during the July 2019 session of the UN High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF). The report of the Secretary-General is released each year to help UN Member States prepare for the HLPF convened under the auspices of the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC).

The 2019 SDG Progress Report finds that progress has been made on a number of SDGs and targets over the past four years. On SDG 1 (no poverty), extreme poverty continues to fall. On SDG 3 (good health and well-being), child mortality rates continue to decrease, and progress has been made against hepatitis. On SDG 5 (gender equality), the report finds an increase in implementing gender-responsive budgeting. On SDG 7 (affordable and clean energy), the poorest countries have increased access to electricity, and energy efficiency continues to improve. On SDG 8 (decent work and economic growth), unemployment has returned to pre-financial-crisis levels, and labor productivity has increased. On SDG 11 (sustainable cities and communities), the proportion of the urban population living in slums has fallen. On SDG 14 (life below water), the proportion of waters under national jurisdiction covered by marine protected areas (MPAs) has increased more than two-fold since 2010.

The report cautions that there is “no way” the world can achieve the 17 SDGs without achieving gender equality.


The SDG Progress Report also demonstrates slow progress on many Goals. It projects that in 2030, the extreme poverty rate will be 6%, missing the target. On SDG 2 (zero hunger), hunger increased for the third consecutive year, and millions of children experience undernutrition. On SDG 4 (quality education), 262 million children and youth were out of school in 2017, and more than 50% of children and adolescents do not meet minimum proficiency standards in reading and mathematics. On SDG 6 (clean water and sanitation), billions lack safe water, sanitation and handwashing facilities, and data suggests that the world needs to double its current annual rate of progress to achieve universal access to even basic sanitation. On SDG 13 (climate action), greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions continue to increase. On SDGs 14 and 15 (life on land), biodiversity is being lost “at an alarming rate” with one million species facing extinction, many within decades. Invasive species and illegal wildlife trafficking continue to undermine efforts to protect and restore ecosystems and species. Progress on SDG 16 (peace, justice and strong institutions) is uneven, with millions deprived of security and rights.

On SDG 10 (reduced inequalities), the report finds slow-paced progress. It cautions that the most vulnerable countries and people suffer the most. Rural and urban differentials persist, such as on higher out-of-school rates for primary and secondary schools in rural areas. The report notes that gender inequalities also persist, cautioning that there is “no way” the world can achieve the 17 SDGs without achieving gender equality and empowering women and girls.

To read more details, please click the link below:

https://sdg.iisd.org/news/special-edition-of-sdg-progress-report-finds-need-for-trajectory-shift/


Russia government approach in the fight against corruption

The Russian government has begun to take creative approaches in the fight against corruption. These initiatives are aimed at raising public awareness of corruption among the general public.

Well its said whoever fights corruption should see to it that in the process he does not become corrupt. Most developed countries are seeking methods to curb corruption & find the best fit solutions for it. Anti-corruption has been a hot topic for almost every country for some time. The thirst to have a corrupt free mechanism for businesses where businesses should work against corruption in all its forms, including extortion and bribery. There are lot of organisations & multi-national companies and foundation have taken initiative to spread public awareness.

Recently, the Russian government has begun to take creative approaches in the fight against corruption. These initiatives are aimed at raising public awareness of corruption among the general public. What appears to be missing in this outreach is compliance guidance to companies in Russia. The Russian Anti-Corruption Law outlines a compliance framework but lacks specifics. Guidance to U.S. companies may be able to fill the gap.

Anti-Corruption Measures Guidance to Companies

The Russian anti-corruption laws offer very little guidance on what a company can and should do to ensure its compliance with anti-corruption laws. Compliance guidance to companies is limited to Article 13.3 of the Russian Anti-Corruption Law, which mandates that companies “develop and take anti-corruption measures.” The Article lists six measures compliance programs may include. They are:

  • (1) the appointment of a compliance officer;
  • (2) cooperation with law enforcement authorities;
  • (3) development and implementation of compliance policies and procedures;
  • (4) adoption of a code of ethics;
  • (5) prevention of conflicts of interest; and
  • (6) prevention of off-the-books record keeping and the use of falsified documents.

These measures are optional, and no additional guidance from the government appears to exist on the components of an effective compliance program.

But What About Businesses?

The government’s public outreach on anti-corruption is aimed at Russian citizens, including “pensioners and students.” But it leaves out businesses, a segment that is just as likely to engage in and suffer the consequences of corruption. In 2018, the Russian government opened 487 investigations against legal entities for bribery under Article 19.28 of the Administrative Offenses Code (Unlawful Remuneration on Behalf of a Legal Entity). These investigations resulted in the administrative fines imposed against 439 entities in the total amount of RUB 691 million (USD 10.7 million).

In 2019, the Prosecutor General’s Office added 35 entities to the public register of Article 19.28 offenders. These companies are prohibited from bidding in federal and municipal procurement tenders for a period of two years from the date of the administrative penalty. The register now lists over 1,200 entities in total.

While these numbers pale in comparison to prosecutions of corrupt government officials in Russia, they show businesses are far from being immune from corruption. This is why it is surprising that the government does not direct its outreach toward businesses as a segment that could benefit from anti-corruption education.

To access to the full blog, please click below:

https://www.anticorruptionblog.com/anti-corruption/anti-corruption-guidance-russia-whats-company-to-do/


Entrepreneurs Care About Corruption – Here’s How to Help Them Fight It.

A friend of mine has been trying to start an artisanal liquor business in a small Latin American country. He learned to ferment fruit, crafted a logo, scrounged for and sanitized several hundred glass bottles, registered his corporation with all the various agencies, and paid all of his initial taxes. After producing his first batch and selling it to a number of small shops, he decided it was time to expand. Unfortunately, when he began to negotiate sales to larger restaurants and grocery stores he ran into a major complication: liquor taxes. The high level of liquor taxation made his business model completely unprofitable. Trying to understand how any other liquor business stayed afloat, he discovered that one liquor manufacturer and importer dominated the market, and didn’t pay any taxes. How? Corruption. In order to stay in business, my friend had a choice: (A) he could stay small, fly under the radar, and avoid paying taxes, or (B) he could navigate the perilous and uncertain process of bribing his way out of paying taxes. He ended up choosing a third option: he closed up shop and went back to his day job.

To access the full blog, please click below:

 https://globalanticorruptionblog.com/2017/05/22/entrepreneurs-care-about-corruption-heres-how-to-help-them-fight-it/

 


HT Youth Survey: Corruption, terrorism biggest challenges

Corruption continues to be deep rooted in the Indian system and maybe that’s why, for the seventh year in a row, it has been ranked as the top most challenge for the country.

To access the full article, please click below:

http://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/ht-youth-survey-corruption-terrorism-biggest-challenges/story-plAif0WlcJkbUbQfI0w3CP.html


No tolerance for corruption in Chinese military: People's Liberation Army Daily

To access the full article, please click below:

http://www.tnp.sg/news/world/no-tolerance-corruption-chinese-military-peoples-liberation-army-daily


Corruption Is Still a Problem 10 Months After India's Cash Ban

To access the full article, please click below:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-08-27/ten-months-after-india-s-cash-ban-corruption-remains-endemic 


How corruption drives inequality, and what we can do about it

From enabling illicit accumulation of wealth by global elites, to denying people access to basic services, corruption – the abuse of entrusted power for private gain – often serves to drive inequality, both within national boundaries and internationally.

http://www.transparency.org.uk/corruption_inequality_what_we_can_do/#.WgFtstWWbIV